Posts Tagged ‘the Great War’

Balance-sheet of the Fist World War – concluded

April 7, 2018

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For some reason I find this section the most jaw-dropping, the most shocking of all; I knew about the human toll of the war in so far as it’s possible to take it in, but the sheer waste of resources is truly mind-boggling…

With the money spent on the war…

You could have provided a furnished villa with garden and outbuildings to a value of 100,000 francs to EVERY family in the following countries: USA, Canada, England, France, Belgium, Germany and Russia, and afterwards you could have built, in all towns with more than 200,000 inhabitants in each of those countries: a hospital for 125 million francs; a library for the same value; a university for 250 million. That done, a reserve fund could have been set up which, at 5% interest, would have provided annuities allowing 125,000 teacher or professors, and 125,000 doctors or nurses to be employed at an average salary of 25,000 francs. And that’s not all! This building finished, and the capital set aside for investment, there would remain a sum equivalent to the total value of property in Belgium and France before the cataclysm!

(concluding the series of posts I introduced here; I hope some readers have found it informative…)

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Balance-sheet of the First World War – 13

March 21, 2018

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Material losses:
number of communes entirely destroyed 1699
number of communes 3/4 destroyed 707
number of communes half-destroyed 1656
number of houses completely destroyed 319,269
number of houses partially destroyed 313,675
number of factories 20,603
kilometres of railway destroyed 7985
bridges destroyed 4875
tunnels destroyed 12
kilometres of road destroyed 52,754
hectares of uncultivated land destroyed 2,060,000
hectares of cultivated land destroyed 1,740,000

(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)
 

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 12

March 18, 2018

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The war goes on… The war is not over for the combatants. The war continues, because it is still killing them. It has been calculated that the mortality of the wounded and mutilated is higher than that of other categories.

Here are the figures:

mortality of wounded and amputees = 76.5 per thousand

mortality of mobilised non-combatants who fell ill = 44 per thousand

mortality of unwounded ex-combatants who spent more than 6 months at the front = 34.5 per thousand

mortality of mobilised non-combatants who were never ill = 23 per thousand

mortality of those not mobilised, from illness = 14 per thousand

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 11

March 15, 2018
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Massacre of the Infantry
The infantry – queen of the battlefield – was particularly tested during the 
1914-18 war. One infantryman in 4 was killed.

Proportionally, infantry losses were 
3 times greater than cavalry
4 times greater than artillery
6 times greater than the combined aviation, supply train teams 
and other front-line services

Finally, General Percin calculated that 75,000 Frenchmen were cut down by 
our own artillery (friendly fire)
(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)
 

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 10

March 13, 2018

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The greatest victims:
4 limbs amputated 3
3 limbs amputated 12
2 arms amputated 96
2 legs amputated 1,289
one arm and one leg amputated 191
blinded and 3 limbs amputated 3
blinded and one limb amputated 121
blinded 3,528
paraplegics permanently confined to bed 100

(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)
 

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 9

March 8, 2018

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Losses by year group

I haven’t translated this chart because it’s numerical, and basically self-explanatory. The class refers to the year a group became of age to undertake military service, I think.

(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 8

March 7, 2018

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Losses by region

I’m afraid I have no way of knowing what regions the different numbers refer to; Paris & Lyon are named at the bottom of the list. I include the table for the sake of completeness; if anyone can enlighten me further, please do.

(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 7

March 6, 2018

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The war by the minute: during the war 

4 killed per minute
240 killed per hour
6400 killed per day
(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)
 

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 6

March 5, 2018

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Losses by category (these figures are for France only)

Troops – infantry:  mobilised 3,957,000; killed 1,158,000;   = 29.9 %
Troops – cavalry: mobilised 280,600; killed 21,400;  = 7.6%
Troops – artillery: mobilised 1,373,000; killed 82,800;  = 6%
Troops – engineers: mobilised 432,500; killed 27,600;  = 6.4%
Troops – aviation: mobilised 102,500; killed 3,600;  = 3.5%
Troops – airbase: mobilised 21,000; killed 560;   = 2.7%
Troops – railway: mobilised 210,000;  killed 7,490;  = 3.6%
Troops – motorised services: mobilised 203,000; killed 3,500;  = 1.7%
Troops – other: mobilised 533,500; killed 16,250;  = 3%

Officers -  infantry: mobilised 100,000 ;  killed 29,200;  = 29%
Officers – cavalry: mobilised 8,400;  killed 865;  = 10.3%
Officers – artillery: mobilised 34,200;  killed 3,140;  = 9.2%
Officers – engineers: mobilised 7,400;  killed 690;  = 9.3%
Officers – aviation: mobilised 5,300; killed 1,145;  = 21.6%
Officers – airbase: mobilised 600; killed 34;  = 5.7%
Officers – railway: mobilised 2,400; killed 105;  = 4.4%
Officers - motorised services: mobilised 3,400;  killed 66;  = 1.9%
Officers – other: mobilised 31,300; killed 1,234;  = 4.1%

(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)
 

Balance-sheet of the First World War – 5

March 3, 2018

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Some comparisons…

the Funeral March If the war dead were lined up in fours for a march-past, a battalion at the rate of one every seven and a half minutes, the funeral procession would take 81 days and 81 nights to pass by.

the Crazy Dance If the war dead held hands in a massive and macabre dance they would reach more than halfway round the world at the 50th parallel, which runs through France.

the Tragic Column If the bodies of the war dead were placed in coffins one on top of another on the site of the Arc de Triomphe, they would form a column 110 times the height of the Arc (5,500 metres), which is 700 metres higher than Mont Blanc.

(continuing the series of posts I introduced here)
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